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Knowledge is Power

This website provides information and resources on FPIC as a tool of self-determination to assist communities in decision making. We have selected articles, tool kits, videos, voice messages, and community stories about FPIC and consultation.

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Total Resources: 44

Finding Common Ground: A Critical Review of Land Use and Resource Management Policies in Ontario, Canada and their Intersection with First Nations
Scientific Paper

2015 - English - Technical

Finding Common Ground: A Critical Review of ...

Carolyn King, Fraser McLeod, Graham Whitelaw et al.


This article analyses selective land use and resource management policies in their ability to recognize the rights of First Nations and Aboriginal peoples and past Crown-First Nations relationships. This study completed a document analysis of provincial legal documents on how they address First Nation issues and areas for improvement. Findings show an urgent need for guidance on how provincial authorities improve policy on relations between First Nations and other jurisdictions.

We Have Rights: A Community Guide for Indigenous Peoples on the 2009 ADB Safeguard Policy Statement and Accountability Mechanism
Manual

This Guide focuses on the Asian Development Bank Safeguard Policy Statement of 2009 (ADB 2009 SPS) particularly its safeguard requirements for Indigenous Peoples. In addition, it features the ADB Accountability Mechanism of 2012. It also contains the principles and process of the Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC).

This book seeks to help indigenous communities and their organisations to provide their people with basic information on REDD+. It is intended as a guide in understanding climate change, REDD+ and how they relate to the recognition and exercise of the collective rights of indigenous peoples.

FPIC and community protocol-type processes are being used to help claim rights and negotiate agreements in various biodiversity contexts. However, recent developments in international law in relation to access to genetic resources and benefit-sharing (ABS) have brought these participatory tools and processes centre stage.

The impacts of contractual agreements between industry and Indigenous communities (IBAs), for Aboriginal peoples are considered. Positive impacts including increased economic and social opportunities are compared with the negative impacts such as damaged relationships and protections from government, environmental groups, and the juridicial system. This paper identifies strategies to address these impacts, to ensure that contractual agreements support community development.

Powerful or Just Plain Power-Full? A Power Analysis of Impact Benefit Agreements in Canada's North
Scientific Paper

This article analyzes Impact-Benefit Agreements (IBAs) negotiated between industry and Aboriginal communities in Northern Canada, to show that they may lead to an inequitable distribution of power in favour of industry. They argue that IBAs can prevent Indigenous communities from making informed decisions with respect to development and discourage information sharing between communities.

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