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Knowledge is Power

This website provides information and resources on FPIC as a tool of self-determination to assist communities in decision making. We have selected articles, tool kits, videos, voice messages, and community stories about FPIC and consultation.

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Total Resources: 180

UNDRIP Changes Indigenous Peoples Articulation of Both Problems and Solutions
Essay

2013 - English - Moderate

UNDRIP Changes Indigenous Peoples Articulati...

Ken Coates, Terry Mitchell


The UNDRIP was defined at the time of its passage as an "aspirational document." Those governments that resisted the declaration — Canada, United States, Australia and New Zealand in 2007 and which signed on later in 2010 — worried that the creation of international law on Aboriginal rights would elevate Indigenous expectations.

Adapting Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) to Local Contexts in REDD++: Lessons from Three Experiments in Vietnam
Scientific Paper

2015 - English - Moderate

Adapting Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (...

Dung Ngoc Le, Guillaume Lestrelin, Hien Thi Vu et al.


This paper examines how FPIC has been applied in three projects in Vietnam and highlights two key lessons: 1) FPIC is likely to be more accepted by the government if it is built upon the national legal framework on citizen rights. 2) FPIC activities should be seen as a learning process and designed based on local needs and preferences.

Free, Prior and Informed Consent is a new global model for relations between state governments and Indigenous communities. This article analyzes state-led consultations in Bolivia’s and Peru’s hydrocarbon sectors. Barriers to effective consultation include: lack of Indigenous ownership; Indigenous visions and demands not being understood; and limited or general outcomes.

This document reviews some of the economic considerations that may positively impact communities and guide decision making with respect to resource extraction on their territories. Economic impacts of development such as royalties or employment and training opportunities are presented as well as different models for economic negotiation including Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) or joint ventures.

Resource Extraction and Aboriginal Communities in Northern Canada: Social Considerations
Manual

This document reviews some of the potential issues and concerns that may arise with respect to the social dimensions of resource extraction, so as to alert Indigenous communities of the potential positive and negative impacts on their communities. The impacts of development on education and employment, housing, access to community and health services, and justice are considered.

This document reviews some of the potential issues and concerns that may arise with respect to the cultural dimensions of resource extraction, so as to warn Indigenous communities of potential negative impacts on their cultures. The impacts of development on traditional knowledge and cultural continuity, access to land and natural resources, and diet and nutrition are considered.

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