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Knowledge is Power

This website provides information and resources on FPIC as a tool of self-determination to assist communities in decision making. We have selected articles, tool kits, videos, voice messages, and community stories about FPIC and consultation.

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Total Resources: 40

This briefing note provides an overview of FPIC in international law and across industry sections. The note also discusses how to identify customary land through mapping; engaging with representative organizations; pairing participation with informed consent; ensuring consent and resolving conflict. This note can inform consent processes throughout the consultation stages.

Initiative on Free, Prior, and Informed Consent - Concept Paper
Report

2010 - English - Moderate

Initiative on Free, Prior, and Informed Cons...

The Forest Dialogue


‘Free, Prior and Informed Consent’ (FPIC) has emerged as a key principle in international law, related to indigenous peoples and is considered necessary in sectors like dam building, extractive industries, forestry, plantations, conservation, bio-prospecting and environmental impact assessment. While the right itself is clearly affirmed, the practicalities for non-State parties to adhere to it are less clear, and so initiatives to ensure FPIC are considered.

This document is a description of a series of workshops conducted in Bogota, Colombia, to engage in discussion about Free, Prior, Informed Consent (FPIC) among Afro and Indigenous communities. The document includes a summary of the discussion in each of the workshops, and is intended to provide frameworks for using FPIC from these communities' perspectives.

This article explores “landscape approaches” to the use of lands, which have emerged in response to the trade-off between the environment and resource development. Different types of landscape approaches to environmental conservation are discussed and ten principles of the approaches are identified. These principles emphasize adaptive management, stakeholder involvement, and multiple objectives.

Recognize Rights, Free Prior and Informed Consent and Traditional Knowledge in Climate Change Talks
Report

Just as they did in the Bonn Climate Talks in August, indigenous peoples, long unrecognized as “guardians of mother earth,” are making their voices heard as state negotiators gather here in Bangkok for the 2nd week of negotiations that would facilitate an agreement in Copenhagen in December 2009.

This report is a special segment to the final report “Below the Surface: Anishinabek Mining Strategy”. The purpose of this segment is to include Serpent River First Nation’s community responses into the “Modernization of Ontario’s Mining Act.” It is particularly important that this segment be shared with the Anishinabek Leadership, Communities, and the Ontario Government, as there are many concerns and issues that Serpent River First Nation had to disclose and bring forward, particularly uranium mining and exploration. Serpent River First Nation had an evening engagement session that was held in the community on the evening December 3, 2008.

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