Knowledge is Power

This website provides information and resources on FPIC as a tool of self-determination to assist communities in decision making. We have selected articles, tool kits, videos, voice messages, and community stories about FPIC and consultation.

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Total Resources: 29

Title is with me
Essay

This article is based on two presentations at the Free, Prior and Informed Consent Forum of 2015, by Chief Roger William. These presentations were made following the legal process that began in 1998 which resulted in the 2014 declaration by the Supreme Court of Canada recognizing Tsilhqot’in title. He suggests that in recognizing the land title of First Peoples, consent is now required for development.

Indigenous Consent and Natural Resource Extraction: Foundations for a Made-in-Canada Approach
Scientific Paper

2017 - English - Moderate

Indigenous Consent and Natural Resource Extr...

Papillon Martin, Rodon Thierry


Controversy over the interpretation of FPIC as a "veto" is a major roadblock to Canada's implementation of UNDRIP.

Lessons from Supreme Court Decisions on Indigenous Consultation
News Article

2017 - English - Moderate

Lessons from Supreme Court Decisions on Indi...

Hasan Nader R., Safayeni Justin


In July 2017, the Supreme Court of Canada released two major decisions on the Crown’s duty to consult and accommodate Indigenous peoples. Those decisions provide important guidance that can help to ensure Indigenous peoples’ constitutional rights are better recognized and respected moving forward.

Consultation or consent; What is required before resource development
News Article

2017 - English - Moderate

Consultation or consent; What is required be...

Smith Peggy


This article touches on Canada's 150th celebration and how it translates into 150 years of colonialism for Aboriginals in Canada.

UNDRIP Implementation: Braiding International, Domestic and Indigenous Laws
Report

This document takes a look at the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in Canada where there is an opportunity to explore and reconceive the relationship between international law, Indigenous peoples’ own laws and Canada’s constitutional narratives.

The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Monitoring and Realizing Indigenous Rights in Canada
Essay

2014 - English - Moderate

The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigeno...

Enns Charis, Mitchell Terry


Despite the government of Canada's endorsement of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), little progress has been made towards its implementation. Canada in a state of crisis.

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